TEL  (940) 872-2242

ADDRESS  507 N Mason St  Bowie, Texas  76230

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Stix & Stones Landscaping | Serving Bowie Texas and Surrounding Counties

Trees

VARIETIES AVAILABLE 

@ STIX & STONES

Come browse over a 1,000 square feet of greenhouse and a full acre of a variety of annuals, perennials, shrubbery, and trees. You are sure to find what you are looking for and probably a few things you didn’t know you could not live without at Stix & Stones Landscaping in Bowie, Texas. We work with our customers to evaluate your needs and identify proper plant material that result in a landscape that thrives and accentuates your property. The relationship we have with our customers is one we hold in high regard and is an important part of the landscape planning process. Call today to check our availability and pricing!
Burr Oak: ​
A large tree of the prairies reaching a height of 80 feet or more and a trunk diameter of 5 feet, with a short body and heavy branches that form an open, spreading crown of dark green foliage.
Bark:
Twigs and branches are thick, developing conspicuous corky ridges after the second year; bark is light gray, rough and breaks into small, narrow flakes on young trees, then develops very thick bark with deep fissures and narrow plates.
Shumard Red Oak: ​
Usually a medium-sized tree to 35 feet tall with one or more trunks 10" in diameter, but can reach heights of 70 feet on fertile sites.
Leaf:
Simple, alternate, 3" to 5" long and 2.5" to 3" wide, widest above the middle, divided into 5 to 7 bristle-tipped lobes, with the terminal lobe often 3-lobed and the sinuses usually deep. Leaves have a slender petiole about 1" long, are dark green and shiny above, paler below, and turn deep shades of red in the fall
Live Oak: ​
A large, stately tree, commonly to 50 feet tall with a short, stout trunk of 4 feet or more in diameter, dividing into several large, twisting limbs that form a low, dense crown that can spread more than 100 feet, the limbs often touching the ground in open-grown settings.
Leaf:
Simple, alternate, evergreen, thick, and leathery; oval, oblong, or elliptical in shape, 2" to 4" long and 0.5" to 2" wide; smooth, glossy, and dark green above, pale and silvery white beneath. Leaves can sometimes be toothed, especially towards the tip.
Chinkapin Oak: ​
A medium or large tree reaching a height of 70 feet and a trunk to 3 feet in diameter, with a rounded crown of glossy, green foliage. It is also planted widely as a shade tree suitable for limestone soils.
Leaf:
Simple, alternate, oval to elliptical or oblong in shape, 4" to 6" long and 1.5" to 2" wide, leaf edge rather sharply toothed but without bristle-tips, teeth slightly recurved.
Bald Cypress: ​
One of the few deciduous conifers of North America, baldcypress is a large tree to over 100 feet tall and a straight trunk to 8 feet in diameter, with numerous ascending branches. Young trees display a narrow, conical outline, but old trees have a swollen, fluted base, a slowly tapering trunk, and a broad, open, flat top.
Leaf:
The slender, light green leaves are flattened, about 0.5" to 0.75" long, very narrow, and arranged in feather-like fashion along two sides of small branchlets 2" to 4" long, which are deciduous in the autumn with the leaves still attached. Flowering branchlets sometimes have awl-like leaves. Fall color is a striking copper or reddish-brown.
Crepe Myrtle:
Perhaps the most common small landscape tree or large shrub planted in Texas, crapemyrtle is usually multi-trunked with smooth, muscular limbs, grows to 20 feet tall and 15 feet wide, with mature trunks ranging from 4" to 12" in diameter.
 
Leaf:
Simple, alternate, 1.5" to 3" long, oval to oblong, thin, blunt-tipped, without teeth along leaf edge. Some cultivars turn red or orange in the fall.
Flower:
Showy spikes of white, pink, red, or purple flowers appear throughout the summer, each made up of petals that resemble crepe-paper. Not fragrant
Red Maple: ​
A medium sized, fast-growing tree that reaches 60 feet tall and a trunk to 2 feet in diameter, red maple has a somewhat narrow, rounded crown.
 
Leaf:
Leaf blades are 2" to 5" long, on a petiole 2" to 4" long, and have from 3 to 5 pointed saw-toothed lobes separated by sharp angular sinuses or openings. In autumn, the leaves turn a brilliant shade of red, or in some varieties, orange-yellow.
Bark:
Smooth and light gray on young tree trunks and branches; breaking into rough, scaly, dark gray bark on old limbs and trunks.